Environmental Stewardship

The Environmental Stewardship Work Area helps us become responsible stewards of God's creation, and care for humankind. We

  • Provide environmental education
  • Encourage individual and corporate green living habits
  • Help the church take steps to make our facilities more energy efficient and earth friendly
  • Provide avenues for environmental social action

Prayer Garden Clean-up

This Spring all are invited to join the Environmental Stewardship Work Group in cleaning out the Prayer Garden. Invasive plants have laid claim to this space and we will work together to clean out the old to prepare for the new. For more details, please contact Sandy Parks at sparks999@att.net.

Location: 
Prayer Garden
Date: 
Sunday, April 23, 2017 - 1:00pm to 3:00pm

Adopt-a-Stream Annual River Clean-up

The Downers Grove First United Methodist Church has adopted a section of St. Joseph Creek located north of Curtiss Street and east of Walnut Avenue about two miles west of our church property. On Saturday, May 20, we’ll gather to clean up the creek by picking up trash along the banks. Please mark your calendar to come and volunteer!

The Adopt-a-Stream program is administered by DuPage County in partnership with The Conservation Foundation, a local nonprofit dedicated to preserving natural areas and rivers and promoting stewardship of the environment. The May 20 clean-up day will be part of their annual DuPage River Sweep.

The only things you’ll need to bring are waterproof boots (or shoes that you don’t mind getting muddy) and work gloves if you have them. Tools, water and snacks will be provided. This is a great activity for kids to participate in with a parent or guardian.

Sign-up sheets will be available prior to the event, or you can email Vera Miller at VeraMiller83@gmail.com to RSVP.

Date: 
Saturday, May 20, 2017 - 9:00am to 12:00pm

Adopt-a-Stream Volunteer Event

Our first Adopt-a-Stream event on May 21 was a great success with 20 volunteers from the congregation helping to clean up a section of St. Joseph Creek.

Sign-up for our second event on October 15 from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. is now underway and we hope that you will join us. Kids age 7 and up can participate with a guardian.

Email Vera at VeraMiller83@gmail.com to sign-up.

Location: 
St. Joseph Creek
Date: 
Saturday, October 15, 2016 - 9:00am to 12:00pm

S.O.S. - Share Our Skills Goes Green

This Saturday, June 11

8:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.

The yard waste dumpster has arrived and so have the weeds! The Board of Trustees and the Environmental Stewardship work area invite you to help clean up the church grounds this Saturday morning for the June Share Our Skills (S.O.S.) event. Bring your favorite garden and lawn tools and join with other church members for a time of fellowship and outdoor work. 

We'll gather in the parlor between 8:30-9:00 and then divide into teams to spruce up the church and parsonage grounds.

Adopt-a-Stream Annual Clean-Up

The Downers Grove First United Methodist Church has adopted a section of St. Joseph Creek located north of Curtiss Street and east of Walnut Avenue about two miles west of our church property. On Saturday, May 21, we’ll gather to clean up the creek by picking up trash along the banks. Please mark your calendar to come and volunteer!

The Adopt-a-Stream program is administered by DuPage County in partnership with The Conservation Foundation, a local nonprofit dedicated to preserving natural areas and rivers and promoting stewardship of the environment. The May 21 clean-up day will be part of their annual DuPage River Sweep. 

The only things you’ll need to bring are waterproof boots (or shoes that you don’t mind getting muddy) and work gloves if you have them. Tools, water and snacks will be provided. This is a great activity for kids to participate in with a parent or guardian.

Sign-up sheets are located on the bulletin board in the narthex, or you can email Vera Miller at VeraMiller83@gmail.com to RSVP.

Date: 
Saturday, May 21, 2016 - 9:00am to 12:00pm

Benefits of Recycling

According to the E.P.A., Reduce, Reuse, and Recycle is very beneficial to our environment. Some of the benefits include saving energy, saving money, reducing the amount of waste sent to our landfills, and allowing products to be used to their fullest extent.

What you may be surprised to learn is that items such as pencils, counter-tops, bicycles, cookware, jackets, carpeting, bridges, and textiles can be made from recycled items.

Ever wonder what happens to your recycled items after they are picked up by the waste management company? Go to www.countyofkane.org and then click on the Recycling tab under the Featured Links heading. Then you need to click once more on the link titled “What Happens to your Recycling after it is picked up?” Here there is a 13 ½ minute video, that explains the process. You can go directly to this video by copying the following web address into your web browser. http://www.countyofkane.org/Pages/commDisp.aspx?focusID=88

Using reusable shopping bags makes a difference too – and – can save you a little bit of money. Stores including Ultra Food and Target will give you 5 cents when you use a reusable bag. If a store you shop at frequently does not offer this service, suggest it to the manager.

Recycling makes a difference. If you need assistance finding a place to take your recyclable items visit www.earth911.org

Your participation in Reduce, Reuse, and Recycle, makes a difference!

Recycle Reminders – Recycle Responsibly

See the document below for some important Recycling Reminders!

Environmental Stewardship Energy Saving Seminar

The Environmental Stewardship Work Area invites you to come and hear about Family Actions at Home: A Challenge for Us to Save Energy. Learn how to keep bills in check and increase home comfort, new smart grid updates, how to use new smart meters to lower costs, how to use a Kill-a-Watt meter to measure energy and an Energy Bike. 

This seminar will be presented by local non-profit group SCARCE. The mission of SCARCE, School & Community Assistance for Recycling and Composting Education, is to inspire people, through education, to preserve & care for the Earth's natural resources, while working to build sustainable communities.

Location: 
Chapel
Date: 
Sunday, October 25, 2015 - 11:15pm

Using Local Produce - Recipes

Summertime! How fortunate we are to enjoy the blessings from our Creator during the days of blue skies, rainbow-colored flowers and garden=fresh vegetables. Whether from our own back yards or from a local farmer’s market, the bounty of organic produce available gives us grateful hearts. When that zucchini comes in, though, Yikes! If you aren’t one to leave it on your neighbor’s doorstep, here’s a healthy cool soup to try yourself.

Chilled Zucchini and Avocado Soup Serves 2-4

4 small or 2 medium zucchini, coarsely chopped 2 avocados, peeled, coarsely chopped

3 green onions or scallions, chopped 2 cloves garlic, peeled and halved

½ tsp. Chili powder

½ tsp. coriander seeds, crushed

1 cup plain yogurt Salt and pepper to taste

¼ cup chopped fresh cilantro

Put first six ingredients in to a food processor and processor until smoothly combined.   Transfer the mixture to a medium bowl, then stir in the yogurt. Refrigerate for at least 1 hour. Season with salt and pepper and garnish with chopped cilantro. 

Roasted Tomato Basil Pesto

2 pre-roasted tomatoes or 1 large fresh tomato

2 cloves garlic, peeled and halved

3 Tbls. Pine nuts

2 Tbls. Extra virgin olive oil

1 cup whole basil leaves

½ cup fresh grated Parmesan cheese

2 Tbls. Soft butter Salt and Pepper

Combine first 6 ingredients in blender and process until just combined.  Add basil to small amounts until all is combined. Stir in Parmesan cheese and butter and season with salt and pepper to taste. Good on pizza, roasted vegetables, or an omelet. Variation: use cilantro instead of basil.

From “Farmer John’s Cookbook”

Advantages for purchasing local produce are it: tastes better, retains its nutrients longer, preserves genetic diversity, is not genetically modified seed, supports local farm families, builds community, preserves open farm space, helps keep lower taxes, supports a clean environment and benefits wildlife, and helps ensure that there will be community farms tomorrow. Don’t forget to look at dgfumc.org/green and scroll down until you see the current month to find out local produce in season that month.

How to Recycle Alkaline Batteries

Remote controls, radios, clocks, children toys and now even in touchless faucets and keyboards; alkaline batteries (AA, AAA, C, D) have been and will continue to be commonplace in our society. The next time you’re using your remote control to change the channel, stop and think a little about how these batteries work. Using metals and chemical reactions, batteries convert chemical energy to electrical energy to provide power to our electronic devices. But where do these chemicals and metals come from? Where will they go when you’re done with them?

Metals used in batteries are mined from the earth, with steel and zinc being the main metallic components of alkaline batteries. In 1996 the Mercury Containing and Rechargeable Battery Management Act passed in the United States that phased out the use of mercury in alkaline batteries. With this and other developments over the past few decades, proven cost effective and environmentally safe recycling processes are not yet universally available for alkaline batteries. Except in the state of California, alkaline batteries are currently considered “safe” for general refuse and can go directly from your trash can to a landfill. Many of us take advantage of this and dispose of our A, AA, C, and D batteries from devices around our house routinely in the trash can.

The next time you go to dispose of an alkaline battery in the trash can, please think of this: alkaline batteries account for 80% of the manufacturer batteries in the US and over 10 billion individual units produced worldwide. Add up the disposal of all of these batteries to our landfills over the years and think of the natural resources (steel, zinc, etc.) that can be saved. Think of the potential unreacted chemicals being put into our landfills, into the ground, and into our waterways.

All of this got me thinking: what can I do to make a difference? I noticed my work had recycling options for many battery types, such as batteries used in cell phones or laptops, but not for alkaline batteries. Due to this, a few years ago I started collecting the alkaline batteries my co-workers and I used at work and the batteries my family used at home. As my battery stockpile exceeded a few hundred I searched for places to take these batteries to for recycling and kept getting the same answer: “You can just put those in the trash”. Recently, I found what I was looking for: The Naperville household hazardous waste drop-off facility is a regional drop off location approved by the IEPA and DuPage County for many hazardous materials, including alkaline batteries. It is open every Saturday and Sunday from 9am-2pm, excluding holidays. http://www.naperville.il.us/hhw.aspx

Consider collecting alkaline batteries at your house, along with other hazardous items, to take to this facility for recycling or see if the hazardous waste drop off area in your village will take alkaline batteries. Every little bit each of us can do will make a difference!

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